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This week the USDA unveiled a new food pyramid - except it’s no pyramid at all, but a plate.
One of its supposed strengths is that its design is so simple, but I think it’s almost too simple. Each of the four parts of the plate is nearly the same size and it’s geared toward portion size rather than a number of servings, which I personally don’t find very helpful.
The L.A. Times also thought the design was a little too simple, perhaps insultingly so.
Author and nutritionist Marion Nestle praised its design, but took issue with the fact that protein is a nutrient, not a food.
However, Andy Bellati wasn’t so enthusiastic. He said the new design is useless unless the U.S. government matches food subsidies with its own recommendations:

I don’t believe Americans are lacking knowledge or awareness that fruits  and vegetables are healthy; the problem is that fruits and vegetables  compete with artificially priced junk food in the marketplace.  Lucky  Charms and Trix are so cheap because they are made with crop subsidies;  meat is cheap because cows are fed government-subsidized crops, and so  on and so forth.  Is My Plate suddenly going to make a pound of  vegetables cost less, and a box of Lucky Charms cost more?  Will My  Plate turn food deserts into areas where residents can have access to  healthy foods?  No.

What are your thoughts?

This week the USDA unveiled a new food pyramid - except it’s no pyramid at all, but a plate.

One of its supposed strengths is that its design is so simple, but I think it’s almost too simple. Each of the four parts of the plate is nearly the same size and it’s geared toward portion size rather than a number of servings, which I personally don’t find very helpful.

The L.A. Times also thought the design was a little too simple, perhaps insultingly so.

Author and nutritionist Marion Nestle praised its design, but took issue with the fact that protein is a nutrient, not a food.

However, Andy Bellati wasn’t so enthusiastic. He said the new design is useless unless the U.S. government matches food subsidies with its own recommendations:

I don’t believe Americans are lacking knowledge or awareness that fruits and vegetables are healthy; the problem is that fruits and vegetables compete with artificially priced junk food in the marketplace.  Lucky Charms and Trix are so cheap because they are made with crop subsidies; meat is cheap because cows are fed government-subsidized crops, and so on and so forth.  Is My Plate suddenly going to make a pound of vegetables cost less, and a box of Lucky Charms cost more?  Will My Plate turn food deserts into areas where residents can have access to healthy foods?  No.

What are your thoughts?

  1. moorestreetfarm answered: i love the simplicity of this and the folks i work with as a food educator appreciate it as well. let’s not take simplicity for granted.
  2. notforfoodies posted this

Everything about your food, except how to make it.